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Hockey tickets for the Glasgow Commonwealth Games will go back on sale on Wednesday morning after a suspension for more than a week due to technical problems.

100,000 tickets across all sports went on sale last Monday, but the process was dogged by long queues and errors on the Ticketmaster-run website and difficulties getting through via phone. Sales were eventually suspended on Tuesday night with around half the tickets still unsold.

Sales now resume on a phased basis on Wednesday morning (May 21) at 10am with tickets for hockey, netball, rugby sevens and the opening and closing ceremonies available. 

From Thursday at 10am tickets for athletics, badminton, squash and table tennis will go on public sale. Any unsold tickets from the previous day will also remain on sale.

Weightlifting, para-sport powerlifting, lawn bowls, rhythmic gymnastics, shooting, boxing, judo and wrestling will complete the phased on-sale on Friday.

There are currently no tickets available for diving, swimming, mountain bike, track cycling, artistic gymnastics or triathlon.

Chris Edmonds, Chairman Ticketmaster UK said: “We were deeply disappointed by, and would like to apologise again for, the challenges experienced by many customers last week, during the launch of the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games general ticket sale.

“We have been working tirelessly to ensure that we have checked, tested and tested again every component of the technical infrastructure supporting the ticketing website. We are confident that all customers will have a much improved customer experience this time around.

“We are still expecting to witness very high levels of demand on the site on each day this week, so would ask all customers to be patient, if they find themselves queuing. Our advice to everyone would be to refrain from refreshing their screens or opening multiple browsers.

“Our number one objective is to sell as many tickets as we can, to help deliver what will undoubtedly be a successful and unforgettable Commonwealth Games.”